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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Daniel Pink. Illustration by Rob Ten Pas

Daniel Pink. Illustration by Rob Ten Pas

Daniel Pink‘s book, Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You’ll Ever Need, will be the publishing company’s first imported manga!

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Keith Yamashita appears on CNBC’s series “The Business of Innovation,” a show about leadership, innovation, and the daring of some of the world’s most ambitious companies. This five-part series airs on Monday nights, starting June 2nd. Maria Bartiromo hosts the show, and Keith is one of the on-air thought leaders who interview CEOs and other innovators. The show features leaders from a number of Keith’s SYPartners’ clients, past and present, such as Nike, Starbucks, Herman Miller, Facebook, among many others. In filming the show, they talked with everyone from legendary leaders like Jack Welch and Howard Schultz to budding entrepreneurs at the Stanford Institute of Design, as well as Silicon Valley’s Randy Komisar, Nobel Laureate Muhummad Yunnis, FedEx CIO Rob Carter, hip-hop clothing moguls, and leaders of entire nations like Singapore. For the next five weeks, Keith will also be blogging about episodes and topics of the show at http://www.keithyamashita.com.

The show airs Mondays at 9pm Eastern time/6pm Pacific time. More information about the show can be read at http://innovation.cnbc.com/.

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Architecture for Humanity and UNICEF are working together to innovate schools and classrooms for children all over the world, scaling architectural innovation to a profound level. As of right now UNICEF and Architecture for Humanity are seeking design and engineering professional to help develop and build a number of educational facilities in West Africa. Their focus at the moment is in Liberia and Ivory Coast, but in the coming months they will look for candidates for Sierra Leone and Guinea. Working in partnership with local communities and the ministry of education, they will design and facilitate the building of two schools that will include alternative energy sources, water reclamation, connectivity, basic services, and play spaces.

In other Architecture for Humanity news, almost $35,000 has been raised for the rebuilding project for Myanmar/Burma since Cyclone Nargis slammed into the country’s southern tip. AFH has spoken with a number of in-country and ex-patriot designers about their strategy for long term rebuilding and have representatives on the ground in Rangoon. Given their available funding they’ve decided to assemble a design team that can focus on the rebuilding of one community that has been devastated by this horrific disaster. AFH is also giving preference to regionally based designers due to the high travel costs associated with getting into Myanmar.

Join hundreds of others and support AFH’s sustainable reconstruction effort, make a donation today by visiting: http://www.architectureforhumanity.org/donate

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LECTURE SUMMARY
Changemakers: Make the Impossible Possible
February 27, 2008

SPEAKER
Bill Strickland, President and CEO, Manchester Bidwell Corporation; author, Make the Impossible Possible: One Man’s Crusade to Inspire Others to Dream Bigger and Achieve the Extraordinary

MODERATOR
Nana Watanabe, photographer and author, Changemakers: Social Entrepreneurs are Making a Difference and Changemakers II: Working as a Social Entrepreneur

Armed with his trusty slide show and 30 years of experience as a leading social entrepreneur, Bill Strickland shared his inspirational story to a packed house at Japan Society on Wednesday, February 27. The program began with an introduction by award-winning photographer and author Nana Watanabe, whose serendipitous meeting with a punk rocker-turned-social entrepreneur earlier in her career motivated her to seek out and publicize the efforts made by social entrepreneurs. Inspired by her successful first book, Changemakers: Social Entrepreneurs are Making the Difference, Japan Society invited her to photograph participants in the U.S.-Japan Innovators Network retreat in San Francisco in June 2006, where she met Bill. Deeply moved and impressed by Bill’s work, Nana profiled Bill in her most recent book Changemakers: Working as a Social Entrepreneur.

Bill Strickland describing his organization in Pittsburgh, the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. ©Satoru Ishikawa.After being introduced and invited to the podium, Bill, a man standing around six feet-five inches tall and whose presence commands attention, began his presentation much like every other presentation he has given: with a joke. He has one presentation and he knows it and openly jokes about it. He says he feels sorry for those who have chosen to listen to it yet again, but deep down you know what he’s about to talk about is no joke. It’s this disarming and charming attitude that puts an audience at ease and allows his powerful message to reach the hearts and souls of people every day.

Bill began his slide show by describing his organization, the Manchester Bidwell Corporation, and the numerous job training and community arts programs they provide to disadvantaged children and adults. Inspired and, as Bill puts it, “saved” by his high school art teacher, Bill knew from the time he entered the University of Pittsburgh as a probationary student that he wanted to transform the lives of the people in his neighborhood. He knew that the first step in achieving his goal was to build a center worthy of the people he wanted to help. It would have to be a beautiful structure with tons of natural light, beautiful displays of artwork, flowers and a huge fountain in front of the building, because according to Bill, “When you put people in a world-class facility, you create world-class people. When you put them in prisons, you get prisoners.” This was his first step in killing the “spiritual cancer” infecting the poor people living in the ghetto. As a result, he had a student of world-renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright design and build his center, which as we all found out, became the scale model for the Pittsburgh Airport.

The second ingredient of Manchester Bidwell’s recipe for success is the cutting-edge education people receive. Not only are students given a sense of the possibilities, but also a sense of control over their lives through music and arts programs. Additionally adults are learning trades such as pharmacology, culinary arts, and horticulture that can be applied to finding jobs that Manchester Bidwell has smartly identified as hard to fill by corporations in the greater Pittsburgh area. Connecting music and ceramics with pharmacology might seem like an odd paring, however Bill’s ability to see opportunities where others might only see obstacles allowed him obtain funding and expand Manchester Bidwell to the point where it is today. His relationship with the late Senator John Heinz brought his center a million dollar kitchen and top-notch culinary arts program, and contacts with Hewlett-Packard birthed a state-of-the-art computer lab and visual arts program.

Bill Strickland and Nana Watanabe fielding questions from the audience. ©Satoru Ishikawa.After expounding Manchester Bidwell’s philosophy of light and beauty as a way to lift people out of poverty, Bill explained his new goal: 100 centers in the United States and 100 around the rest of the globe. Centers have already been built in San Francisco, Cincinnati and Grand Rapids, MI, and new centers in places like Philadelphia and New Orleans are in the planning stages. Internationally, Bill was recently in Israel and sat down with Jews and Arabs where they discussed a plan for a new center that would target a diverse group of Jewish and Arab children and adults as well as immigrants to Israel from Russia, Ethiopia and around the world. Conversations about building centers have also begun in Ireland, South Africa, San Paulo and Costa Rica

Bill wants his book Make the Impossible Possible to be a source of inspiration and guiding light for people without hope. He wants a number one book for the media attention and financial backing that a best selling book can bring to help him communicate his message all over the world.

The lecture was followed by a Q&A session, reception and book signings by Bill and Nana.

[photos by Satoru Ishikawa]

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Wednesday, February 27
6:30 pm
Japan Society (333 East 47th Street, New York, NY)

Bill Strickland, Nana Watanabe

Over the past 30 years, Bill Strickland, a leading American social entrepreneur, has been transforming the lives of thousands of people through jobs training center and community arts programs at Manchester Bidwell. He and his staff strive to give disadvantaged kids and adults the opportunities and tools they need to envision and build a better future. Keying off his new book, Make the Impossible Possible (January 2008, Currency/Doubleday), Mr. Strickland, a master storyteller, shares his inspirational story from growing up in a Pittsburgh ghetto to running a nationally-recognized organization that successfully balances social action, artistic creativity and entrepreneurial acumen. More recently he has worked with the Society’s U.S.-Japan Innovators Network, a multidisciplinary network of innovative leaders committed to creating a better world. Nana Watanabe, an award-winning photographer and author of Changemakers II: Working as a Social Entrepreneur (in Japanese), which includes Mr. Strickland, will preside. Followed by a reception and book signing.

Tickets $10/$8 Japan Society members/$5 students & seniors
Purchase Tickets at www.japansociety.org

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